DEER HORN SIGNS STRATEGIC PARTNERSHIP AGREEMENT WITH FENIX ADVANCED MATERIALS

Deer Horn Signs Strategic Partnership Agreement with Fenix Advanced Materials

DEER HORN SIGNS STRATEGIC PARTNERSHIP AGREEMENT WITH FENIX ADVANCED MATERIALS

Deer Horn Capital Inc. has signed a Strategic Partnership Agreement with Trail, BC’s Fenix Advanced Materials (Fenix) for potential future tellurium extraction and purification and other synergies to achieve a vertically integrated enterprise for cleantech metals.

Fenix Advanced Materials is a clean technology company specializing in the manufacture of ultra-high purity (UHP) metals. The company sells a variety of UHP metals for use in solar energy, telecommunications and infrared applications for commercial and military use. Fenix is one of the very few companies in the world achieving “six nines” (99.9999%) and even “seven nines” (99.99999%) purity in its metal products.

“Tellurium is extremely important to our vision and strategy going forward,” said Fenix CEO, and KAST Entrepreneur In Residence, Don Freschi. “We see a significant increase in tellurium demand long-term, which is why we’re partnering with a number of universities and organizations for research, extraction and processing for technologies in our pipeline that require ultra-high purity tellurium and other critical metals. The Deer Horn gold-silver-tellurium property, along with the Deer Horn’s technical team, offers us a strategic potential domestic supplier of tellurium located within the same province.”

Current strategic partners with Fenix include Teck Metals, The University of British Columbia and Redlen Technologies of Victoria, BC. The company anticipates international partnerships in education, research, mining, and critical metals processing in the coming year.

Said Deer Horn President and CEO Tyrone Docherty, “The Fenix partnership represents a key piece of the foundation we’re building for an integrated, critical metals enterprise. We’re thrilled to join the roster of exceptional strategic partners Fenix has assembled to make this happen, and we look forward to engaging with them. Going forward, we expect to announce other partnerships as part of our long-term vision and strategy to supply critical metals for clean technology and a low-carbon economy.”

“I think the world is beginning to recognize the importance of stable and domestic supplies of critical metals, especially the very rare metals like tellurium,” said Docherty. “We are preparing to help meet that need.”

To read Deer Horn Capital’s full press release click here.

Clean Energy BC Powering Generations: Legacy to the Future Conference 2019

Clean Energy BC Conference – Powering Generations: Legacy to the Future 2019

Clean Energy BC Powering Generations: Legacy to the Future Conference 2019

The Clean Energy BC Powering Generations: Legacy to the Future, June 4th-6th, 2019, showcases Trail and the Kootenays’ legacy of engineering excellence and how this impacts innovation in the region’s tech sector.

Powering Generations: Legacy to the Future is a three-day conference provides a networking opportunity to connect clean energy industry professionals, community leaders, First Nations, and technology innovators; providing a platform for urban-rural knowledge sharing.

Attendees will engage in dialogue that encourages economic diversification through clean energy projects and pushing the tech frontier, recognizing the Kootenays as a thriving hub.

Who Should Attend Clean Energy BC Powering Generations?

Clean energy industry professional
Community shaper
Clean tech enthusiast
Policy designer
First Nations leader
Young professional aspiring to join the industry

Powering Generations is the ideal setting for you to collaborate, network, and share your knowledge with others!

KAST board member Jason Taylor, a specialist in digital fabrication, rapid prototyping and advanced manufacturing and an Instructor and Researcher at Selkirk College, will be speaking at Powering Generations 2019.

Jason was fundamental in the development and implementation of the MIDAS Fab Lab and will be speaking at Plenary 3 — Building the Clean Economy: Job Opportunities with CleanBC.

Join Jason at Powering Generations and register today! REGISTER NOW!

Who is Clean Energy BC?

Clean Energy BC (CEBC) is an industry association that has been the voice of BC’s clean energy industry for over 25 years. CEBC supports BC’s transition to low-carbon energy through the development of effective climate policy and clean energy electrification.

The purpose of our association is to:

    • Promote and support the growth of BC’s clean energy industry
    • Assist the growth of manufacturing, supply, and service industries in BC, serving clean energy production in the province and around the world
    • Build strong relationships with all levels of government, BC Hydro, First Nations, environmental organizations and the public to improve the sector’s social license
    • Ensure the business and regulatory climate is reasonable and efficient for operating assets
    • Improve the regulatory and economic environments for clean energy production in BC
    • Work with environmental organizations to develop science-based clean energy development models

Interested in learning more? Visit Clean Energy BC Powering Generations: Legacy to the Future.

New Energy Grant Targets Community Buildings

CBT Energy Sustainability Grants

From town halls to seniors’ centres, community purpose buildings are well-used gathering places that can use a lot of electricity and be costly to operate. The new Energy Sustainability Grant from Columbia Basin Trust can help these buildings generate energy, increase energy efficiency and sustainability, and reduce energy costs.

“Basin residents told us that alternative and renewable energy are important to them,” said Johnny Strilaeff, Columbia Basin Trust President and Chief Executive Officer. “We’ve already supported a few successful projects in the region and we have now created the Energy Sustainability Grants program to support even more. The goal is to support community efforts to generate energy, while reducing energy costs, saving money and becoming more environmentally and economically sustainable.”

The program provides funding for community buildings that will generate their own energy using alternative and renewable methods such as installing solar panels, biomass energy boilers or wind turbines. There’s additional support for energy conservation and efficiency efforts, such as upgrading lighting, insulation or the heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems.

The buildings must be actively used by the general public and owned by a non-profit organization, local government or First Nation.

Depending on the project scope, available support ranges from 50 to 75 per cent of project costs, up to a maximum grant of $100,000 per category. Funding is also available to help install level 2 electric vehicle charging stations.

There is $900,000 available for this first intake which closes January 7, 2019. Learn more here.

Forestry: A Success Story in Clean Tech

Forestry: A Success Story in Clean Tech

Forestry: A Success Story in Clean Tech

The Canadian forestry sector has become a leader in clean energy and clean tech, both in industry and the communities it serves.

The Canadian forestry sector has become a leader in clean energy and clean tech, both in industry and communities it serves. The industry has already met the 2016 Paris Agreement target of reducing GHG emissions to 30 per cent below 2005 levels by 2030. Derek Nighbor, head of the Canadian Forest Products Association, tells a Canadian success story.

For more than three decades, the Canadian forest products sector has been a leader in the innovation, development, and utilization of clean technologies—and in doing so, has positioned itself at the forefront of energy change that benefits
the environment and the economy.

The pulp and paper sector began showing signs of success in reducing greenhouse gases (GHGs) in the 1990s. Throughout the 2000s, some 30 facilities across the country were upgrading their energy systems to produce green electricity from biomass.

Enough electricity is produced across the Canadian forest products sector to power the city of Vancouver for an entire year. Over the course of this transformation, the sector has cut its GHGs by approximately 67 per cent.

Today, enough electricity is produced across the Canadian forest products sector to power the city of Vancouver for an entire year. Over the course of this transformation, the sector has cut its GHGs by approximately 67 per cent.

The industry has continued to gain momentum by advancing its clean energy agenda with a total investment of more than $2 billion in innovation development.

Between 2010 to 2015, for example, Canfor Corporation invested a total of $400 million in capital upgrades to its Prince George, British Columbia facility which included $58 million to increase the facility’s power generation and energy efficiency.

The investment paved the way for a strategic partnership with Licella Fibre Fuels and Canfor Pulp through which the two companies researched opportunities to integrate Licella’s unique and patented Catalytic Hydrothermal Reactor (Cat-HTR) upgrading platform into Canfor Pulp’s kraft and mechanical pulp mills.

Through the conversion of biomass, which included wood residue from Canfor Pulp’s kraft pulping processes, the Cat-HTR was recognized as a technology that could reportedly take between 20 to 30 minutes to produce a renewable biocrude oil that would lead to the production of next-generation biofuels and biochemicals.

In recent years, other Canadian industry leaders have been equally proactive in implementing clean technology developments.

Amidst a number of clean energy developments came the world’s first cellulose filament plant, in Quebec. In 2013, FPInnovations launched a revolutionary three-year research project on cellulose filaments (CF). Working with the newly formed Kruger Biomaterials Inc, the world’s first cellulose filament demonstration plant was opened in Trois-Rivières. The plant has a five-tonne a day production line and operates on a simple and efficient chemical-free process that only uses mechanical energy and wood fibres.

A Canadian innovation, CF is an engineered biomaterial extracted from wood pulp fibre through mechanical peeling. The process does not require the use of chemicals or enzymes and does not produce effluents, making them environmentally friendly and well-suited for the Canadian forest industry. CF is considered a highly innovative wood-fibre-based biomaterial that will continue to have a transforming impact on Canada’s forest products sector due to its capacity to be integrated into other materials and enhance their strength, lightweight, and flexibility characteristics.

There are a number of examples of biomass being used outside of the sector, including the Bio-energy Research and Demonstration Facility (BRDF) that opened in British Columbia in 2012. In partnership with the federal government and forestry partners such as FPInnovations, Canada’s wood products research institute, and the Canadian Wood Council, the University of British Columbia (UBC) launched the facility—a $34 million clean energy structure that produces clean heat and electricity from renewable bioenergy.

The BRDF daily operation requires two to three truckloads of tree trimmings and wood chips diverted from local municipalities, sawmills, and land-clearing operations—and generates the same amount of clean electricity as what it would take to power 1,500 homes. At the same time, it has also reduced UBC’s natural gas consumption by 12 per cent, not to mention the campus’ greenhouse gas emissions by 9 per cent which is the equivalent of taking 1,000 cars off the road.

At the time it was built, the BRDF facility, 1,900 square metres in total, represented the first North American commercial application of Cross- Laminated Timber (CLT). So, not only did the facility produce green energy, it was built using CLT, which is now much more widely used in North America, with one such manufacturing facility operating in B.C.

CLT is a multi-layered wooden panel where layers are stacked in a perpendicular fashion and glued together using hydraulic or vacuum presses. From a builder’s perspective, the end result is a material that is faster and less costly to use, stronger, able to be turned into panels off-site and ahead of time (no matter the weather), and sustainable.

In addition to the numerous clean innovation advancements, Canada also has a framework in place that specifically supports those initiatives. Launched last year by the Canadian Council of Forest Ministers (CCFM), Canada’s Forest Bioeconomy Framework lays the groundwork for a forest bio-economy of the future that identifies sustainable bio-based materials from healthy forests available for high value-added manufacturing.

The framework highlights innovation, collaboration, and investment, and opens the door to further enhancing the sustainability of Canadian forestry on a public policy framework.

Wood is the one truly sustainable building material as it is sourced from Canada’s forests that are among the most strictly regulated in the world, and it sequesters carbon both in the forest and after trees become wood products in building construction.

Wood is the one truly sustainable building material as it is sourced from Canada’s forests that are among the most strictly regulated in the world, and it sequesters carbon both in the forest and after trees become wood products in building construction. This includes high-rise commercial buildings, otherwise referred to as tall wood structures.

Since the introduction of CLT in North America, tall wood buildings such as Brock Commons, an 18-storey mass timber student residence located at UBC, are becoming more evident.

In Quebec City, the Origine Eco-Condos development will when completed, be the tallest tall-wood condominium structure. The building consists of 12 storeys of mass timber sitting above a one-storey concrete podium and underground parking garage. The building’s elevator and stairwell shafts are constructed with Canadian CLT and the building’s design has been modelled after Construction of Tall Wood Buildings in Canada which was published by FPInnovations.

Two years ago, Canada’s Forest Products Association of Canada (FPAC) challenged industry members across the country to exceed greenhouse gas emission targets with their 30 X 30 Climate Change Challenge.

Canadian forestry GHG targets

In support of Canada’s commitments to the Paris Agreement, Canada’s forest sector pledged to the annual removal of 30 megatonnes (MT) of CO2 per year by 2030—more than 13 per cent of the Canadian government’s emissions target. It also made the forest sector the first to voluntarily contribute to the federal government’s climate goals.

The sector calculated the 30MT reduction could be reached by further improvements to forest management activities to maximize carbon storage, increasing the use of innovative forest products and clean tech to displace materials made from fossil fuels, and finding further energy efficiencies at mill sites.

The Canadian forest products sector continues to stay ahead of the curve in how it is developing and advancing clean technology innovation for a clean energy, zero-waste bio-economy future.

The industry remains committed to doing its part to transform Canada into a bio-energy and bio-materials powerhouse and is proof that advancing clean technology works for the environment and the economy, creating opportunities for Canadians to be part of a workforce that is increasingly among the greenest in the nation.